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  • Article

Inclusive Content is Good for Business

Charlene Polite CorleyVP Diverse Insights & Partnerships, Nielsen

Key Takeaways

  • Nielsen research found that 41% of viewers were more likely to buy from brands that advertised in content that represented them.
  • Less than a third of today’s programs represent women at population parity. Women are more than half of the population yet women are represented at 43% of share of screen time in lead or recurring roles on TV.
  • Viewers were 3x as likely to see a man over age 50 than a woman in the same age group on screen.
  • South Asian women’s share of screen time was just .3% last season—a fraction of their 2.3% population estimate.
  • Certain populations are missing and erased altogether—Native American women had zero representation in 86% of TV programming genres, including formats like national news.
  • On average a third of women feel how they are depicted on screen is inaccurate.

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Overcoming the Diversity Gap in Mobile Gaming

Chloé GingrichGlobal Insights Strategist, Gaming & eCommerce, Meta Stephen GrayVertical Research Manager, Meta

Key Takeaways

  • Mobile gamers surveyed felt more connected and immersed in gameplay with characters that represented them or people like them.
  • The gap between mobile gamers’ desire for diversity and their actual gaming experience reflected that less than 40% of gamers felt represented by gaming characters.
  • Make gaming inclusive from development through to execution. Bake diversity in throughout the entire process of developing and marketing a game to show an integrated commitment to inclusion—never try to add diverse representation to a game as an afterthought or in an ad.
  • Promoting diversity should go hand in hand with safety in virtual spaces.
  • Avoid all stereotypes that include hypersexualization of women and hypermasculinity in character design.
  • Don’t use advertising to imply that the game is more inclusive than it is. The most effective ads should showcase exciting aspects of gameplay, as well as meaningful nuanced representation.

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Strategies for Managing Internal and External Relationships

  • WOMEN IN ANALYTICS

On April 7, the Women in Analytics Group held a mentoring meet-up about strategies for managing internal and external relationships. Ramla Jarrar, Founder & CEO of Mass Analytics and Therese Glennon, VP at Bristol Myers Squibb, shared best practices for building and maintaining relationships in-person and remotely. After the mini talks, each speaker met with half of the attendees and then switched groups to meet with the other half of the attendees.

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Mentoring Meet-up — Three Leaders, Three Stories (Event Summary)

  • WOMEN IN ANALYTICS

At our first ARF Women in Analytics Mentoring Meet-Up of the year, we heard from three industry trailblazers on the “what”, “why” and “how” of their careers. Colleen Funkey of The Estée Lauder Companies, Gloria Cox of The Cambridge Group and Renata Policicio of WarnerMedia reflected on their unique journeys and shared the steps they took and lessons they learned. From what inspired them to originally go into market research to how they now navigate their careers at a senior level, speakers gave attendees advice on what they can do to ensure their careers are satisfying and successful. Attendees also participated in small breakout groups with the speakers to connect, ask questions and share their own personal reflections.

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NYCU: Sports Illustrated Announces New Advertising Mandate

On the 58th anniversary of its annual Swimsuit issue, SI announced its Pay With Change Initiative. It mandates that only brands that support gender equity causes can advertise in the May 2022 Issue. Sports Illustrated Swimsuit has been leading the charge in creating change in women’s lives for years, despite what some critics and naysayers would like you to believe,” said MJ Day, Editor-in-Chief of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit. “However, in a world where women’s bodies are under attack and their value is continuously underestimated, we knew we needed to act in a bold, more responsible way. Pay With Change is not just a platform to us, it is our commitment to creating greater progress for women.” The Pay With Change platform changes the cost of doing business for the issue from a monetary value to a “currency of doing good.” The magazine will look at the progress a brand has made, is currently making and will make by May to determine if they should be able to advertise in the Swimsuit issue. The issue will also only feature advertisements that showcase the progress each brand is making with their gender equality efforts. The brands will be featured in the print issue, digital properties and on social media. In addition to the new advertising mandate, Sports Illustrated will donate a percentage of every ad dollar generated from the Swimsuit issue to create the Sports Illustrated Gender Equity Fund, which will support nonprofit organizations driving gender equality. Source: Ilchi, L. (2022, January 20). Sports Illustrated Announces New Advertising Mandate for Swimsuit Issue. WWD.  

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NYCU: New Skills for Women in Analytics

At this ARF Women in Analytics event, Keynote Speaker Alexandra Samuel, co-author of Remote, Inc.: How to Thrive at Work…Wherever You Are, drew on her extensive remote work research and experience to share how to build an organizational model and culture that enables employees to shift between lively collaboration and solo focus on work.   Key findings:

  • Everyone reported they were at least as productive at home, and more than half said they were more productive.
  • Remote work is a learned skill and folks who already worked at home already had a chance to develop the skills needed.
  • As we shift to hybrid, there are three aspects that we should focus on: think about objectives and shift towards measurable KPIs, rethink your approach to collaboration, and get clarity around communication.
A panel discussion was held to discuss Alexandra’s presentation, as well as share experiences shifting to a hybrid model. The participants were: Jackie Day, Senior Partner, Director Multicultural Marketing & Analytics, GroupM; Neelima Panuganti, Consumer & Growth Insights Sr. Manager, NA, General Mills; Audrey Rusch, Sr. Director of Activation Product Development, Oracle; and Ann Semeraro, Sr. Director of Consumer and Customer Insights, Twitter. Rachael Feigenbaum, SVP Events, ARF, moderated. All panelists work at companies that have some form of flexible hybrid working format. Here are leadership tips shared for a modern hybrid working environment:
  • Properly manage objectives.
  • Set clear boundaries when it comes to time and projects, and only say yes to those that have clear business impact.
  • Reinforce messaging for priorities throughout the week to break through the clutter.
  • Shift from process-oriented meetings to open communication.
  • Develop relationships in a “safe space” and contribute to initiatives that promote healthy states of minds and support allies in the workplace.
  • Be a good coach to team members.
  • Consider new employees and integrate them into team culture.
  • Avoid burnout by implementing no meeting times.
  • Be more agile as the world is changing.
  • Stay true to yourself and be authentic.
  • Embrace and recognize the benefits of having more of a human connection with your colleagues.
Source: ARF Women in Analytics. (2021, December 7). Modern Leadership: New Skills for a New Era. The ARF.  

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NYCU: New Insights from the Journal of Advertising Research (JAR)

A recent ARF Insights Studio event featured four JAR papers. Here are key findings from two of them. Additional data were presented at an ARF & IPA event  What happens when a brand stops advertising for a year or longer? This Australian study examined sales trends when brands stopped broad-reach advertising for a long duration, specifically 1996-2015.

  • The researchers found significant declines in brand sales after one year and even sharper declines after two or more years without advertising. However, not all brands were affected in the same way. For example, big brands’ sales dropped less than those of small brands and brands that were previously growing larger saw sales continue to rise even after advertising stopped.
Note: More research on this topic was presented at an ARF & IPA event, “The Art and Science of Advertising,” last week. The impact of showing women in male-stereotyped job roles in advertisements. This study was conducted by researchers at the Stockholm School of Economics in the US, UK and Sweden. It compared reactions to advertisements showing men in typical and women in atypical roles (such as firefighters) The findings suggest that:
  • Nonstereotyped occupational gender role portrayals in advertising are likely to increase attention to the ad and result in positive effects for the brand, such as perceptions of higher product quality​
Additional papers: Two more papers were presented, one on the importance of using strict controls when exploring the impact of advertising to avoid misleading findings. A fourth paper suggested “a preliminary roadmap” to enhance the creative process while also providing creative professionals with consumer insights. Sources and for more information: Inside the JAR: Going “Dark,” Causality, Gender and Creativity (Event Summary) – The ARF For additional information on “when brands go dark”: The Art and Science of Advertising (Event Summary) – The ARF IPA | Share of Search: one year on

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NYCU: Job-hopping Heats Up

Nearly two-thirds of workers are on the hunt for a new job, while almost nine out of 10 company executives say they are seeing higher-than-normal turnover at their organizations, according to a new survey from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). The number of workers looking for a new job has almost doubled since spring. About 64% reported they were seeking a new job at the start of August, when PwC surveyed 1,007 full-time and part-time U.S.-based employees and 752 executives. That's up from 36% of workers in May. It’s a "significant" jump, Neil Dhar, PwC's chief client's officer, said. "Simply put, many workforces are just tired, and they're looking for change." Hispanic and Black employees are more likely to be looking—82% and 67%, respectively—than white workers, about 57% of whom cited a desire for a new job.

  • The biggest reason for the job search for many is a better salary, with 46% of women saying better pay was the biggest driver compared to 34% of men.
Many companies are recognizing this and increasing the pay rates on certain jobs. Wall Street firms Bank of America, Barclays, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley have raised the salaries of their first-year analysts this year. What’s more, many retailers and restaurant chains, including Costco, Chipotle, McDonald’s and Under Armour, have boosted their minimum wages to $15 or more to entice workers. After salary, workers cited better benefits and career advancement as other top motivators. "Employees have been clear that they deeply, deeply value nonmonetary benefits like expanded flexibility, career growth, well-being, and upskilling," Dhar said. Source: Leonhardt, M. (2021, August 20). Job-hopping heats up: 65% of U.S. workers are looking for a new job. Fortune.  

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NYCU: International Women’s Day

To celebrate International Women‘s Day, brands all over the globe have responded to the #ChooseToChallenge theme.  The Drum highlights some of the best campaigns. Mars launched #HereToBeHeard, a global, crowdsourcing campaign that aimed to elevate the voices of women from all intersections – including race, age, sexuality, religion and ability – to help shape a more inclusive business environment and create a world where all women can thrive. Lego is recreating its iconic 1981 ad, 40 years after it first ran. Designed to, “encourage and champion today‘s young women,” the campaign gives them the opportunity to insert themselves into the frame, creating their own personal version. Lego’s campaign responds to research that found 73% of parents believe gender differences are driven more by societal expectations than biology. Women globally do three times more work in the home than men, and the pandemic has only intensified many household pain points. To help couples open an honest and fun conversation about how to better balance their responsibilities at home, Ikea has released a free, digital card game. North Face is using its brand anthem, voiced by musician Jess Glynne, to feature individuals and communities that are proud to be different. It highlights the work of human rights lawyer Stephanie Case, climber Ashima Shiraishi, members of the She Runs It community and artist-activist Miramar Muhd. Worldwide, just 21% of electronic music festival acts are women. As few as 2% of music producers are women. And so TikTok wants to raise the voices of women in music. Appearing across social and digital platforms, the #Wearehere film features Nina Nesbitt who wrote the soundtrack with International Women‘s Day in mind. These are just a few of the best campaigns. The remaining ones are available to access via the link at the bottom. Source: Watson, I. (2021, March 8). International Women’s Day: the best brand campaigns that ‘#ChooseToChallenge.’  News: The Drum.  

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