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privacy

Streaming Data and Privacy

Many consumers don’t want advertisers to collect their personal information and shopping data. Are there also privacy concerns when streaming services collect and analyze viewing data to make recommendations?   Read more »

The Measurement Dilemma — Navigating Privacy-Driven Disruption

  • Insights Studio

Changes in privacy legislation, the deprecation of the third-party cookie, and new rules on Google and Apple platforms have set the stage for the impending data disruption in the advertising industry, as outlined in IAB’s State of Data 2022 report and OptiMine’s overview on Google Topics. Both presentations and the subsequent panel discussion in this Insights Studio session emphasized the unavoidable impact the loss of individual tracking will have on measurement and attribution and urged marketers to act quickly to prepare for the effects on revenues.

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A Conversation with Horizon’s CEO

Bill Koenigsberg talks about the future of media, the crisis in Ukraine and how Horizon is getting staff back into the office. Horizon Media has just reopened its doors to staff after yet another COVID-19 shutdown and is ready to get people back into the office on a hybrid schedule. As Media CEO Bill Koenigsberg puts it, you can't compete with rolling out of bed in your pajamas, but people do miss being together. Koenigsberg is at the helm of Horizon as it navigates a complex and shifting media landscape for clients -- from the end of cookies to the rise of the metaverse, to all things shoppable commerce. These changes are informing the agency's strategy, from its data platform blu to upfront negotiations. Koenigsberg also talks about how Horizon is helping clients navigate the crisis in Ukraine and where he sees growth coming from in 2022. Source: Weissbrot, A. (2022, March 3). Campaign Chemistry: Horizon Media CEO Bill Koenigsberg. campaignUS.

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NYCU: Will Consumers Trade Data for Personalized Offers?

Merkle's Q1 2022 Customer Engagement Report, released this week, indicates that most consumers are quite willing to share their data in return for relevant offers. Merkle, a part of Dentsu, surveyed 2,000 U.S. consumers at the end of 2021. Eighty six percent of respondents say they are likely to trade their data to receive personalized offers based on their interests and browsing or purchase history. In addition, 90% say they will share more data if they have a positive experience with a brand. But 70% expect something in return. "Our study shows that consumers are increasingly aware of what personal data they are sharing with brands and have a heightened sense of the value exchange that they receive," states Michael Komasinski, global CEO at Merkle. "Brands need to continue to up their game on the customer experiences that they create and be strategic with how data drives value for consumers in both known and unknown interactions along a customer journey," Komasinski says.

Source: Schultz, R. (2022, February 21). Consumers Will Trade Data For Personalized Offers: Merkle.EmailMarketingDaily, MediaPost.

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NYCU: The Future of Programmatic Advertising

Findings from a Google commissioned study of marketers and advertising professionals show how they think about programmatic advertising, in light of changes in access to third-party cookies and shifts in consumer privacy preferences.   Tiffany Miller, on “Think with Google” says: The good news is that marketers and agencies can win with privacy-first marketing. One key success factor is for advertisers to evolve their tech and data infrastructure to decrease reliance on third-party data. Google commissioned Forrester Consulting to field an online survey with 1,065 brand marketers and ad agency professionals. The results revealed that, while marketers and agency professionals continue to have faith in programmatic advertising, they look to automation, machine learning and new skill sets to help future-proof their advertising needs.

  • Agencies and marketers continue to see programmatic as an essential part of their future success and even envision a 39% increase in programmatic spend over the next 12 months. In their eyes, the original promise of programmatic advertising remains intact, with 87% saying they are confident that it is the best way to overcome increased data fragmentation. It remains the most efficient way for advertisers and media agencies to connect with publishers and operate large-scale ad campaigns.
  • But the picture is not all rosy. In fact, 78% of marketers and media agencies say they are already seeing the impact of data transformation today — most commonly through challenges in verifying the quality of buys, differentiating ads and strategy, and reaching the right audience. As a result, they are reassessing their needs and are prioritizing features and partners that will allow them to adapt to rapidly evolving regulatory restrictions and consumer expectations. Eighty-five percent note that they are changing their programmatic advertising tactics today because of future privacy changes. They do so in four ways: Test new data sources, explore new environments., turn to automation and machine learning and invest in new skills.
In sum, Miller says: Act today. We’re living at a defining point in time for the programmatic industry. If you, like 79% of marketers and media agency professionals, believe the decisions you’re making now will impact the rest of your career, don’t sit on the sidelines. Take these steps today to best prepare for tomorrow. So, the answer isn’t less programmatic advertising but more sophisticated programmatic advertising. Source: Miller, T. (2022, February). 4 steps to future-proof your programmatic strategy. Think with Google.  

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NYCU: The Perils of Privacy Protection

Instead of protecting consumers’ privacy, “Do you accept cookies?” banners seem to have the opposite effect. Regulators hoped that a notice of a website’s privacy policy and a button to accept or reject cookies would go a long way towards solving digital privacy.  Research, however, suggests that it is not working out that way. Most people don’t read the banners, many don’t really understand what cookies do and don’t seem to care or exhibit “digital resignation” -- the feeling that they can’t do much about the use of their data.  Max Schrems, an Austrian privacy advocate who played a key role in pushing for this regulation, now says the cookie banners “have become almost a useless exercise.” An additional problem is the proliferation of “consent management platforms” that help companies to create cookie banners that make it likely that nearly all users hit the “accept” button, for example, by removing the “opt out” button. Source: Nocera, J. (2022, January 30). How Cookie Banners Backfired. Business & Policy: DealBook Newsletter, The New York Times. Note: Only subscribers of The New York Times can access the complete article.

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NYCU: New ARF Study on Privacy and Trust

The ARF’s latest report, its yearly Privacy Study, examines trends in consumer attitudes towards sharing personal information with advertisers, as well as their trust in various institutions.   Here are some key findings from the report, based on a survey of over 1,200 consumers conducted in Q3 of last year:

  • The types of information people are willing and not willing to share have remained consistent with prior years. They are least likely to share their Social Security number, financial and medical information and home address and phone number(s).  However, the prospect of getting more relevant advertising appears to enhance their willingness to share most types of information.
  • Hard-core resistance to targeted advertising appears to be confined to between one quarter and 40% of the population, depending on the source of the targeting information. Vigilance in taking actions to preserve privacy, such as frequently changing privacy settings or updating ad blockers, is limited to a minority of 15% to 25%; far more people rarely or never take such actions.
  • There is much greater trust in financial and medical institutions to protect consumers’ data than in advertisers and social media platforms. Trust in scientists and technical experts appears to have dipped since 2020 but remains far stronger than trust in the media and advertising. Trust in institutions is generally stronger among younger Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, Northeasterners and Democrats. The exception is trust in local police: trust is higher among older Americans, whites and Republicans.
Source: The ARF. (2022, January 20). The ARF’s 4th Annual Privacy Study. The ARF.  

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