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One Size [Does Not] Fit All Optimizing Audio Strategies for Success

What spot length works best? Audacy partnered with Veritonic to compare frequent radio listener responses to 15, 30 and 60-second ads across multiple categories such as auto, financial, retail and professional services to address this frequently asked question. Jenny Nelson (Audacy) and Korri Kolesa (Veritonic) presented the results of this study, which were measured by Veritonic’s audio score components such as attribute score, intent score and engagement score. This survey-based study of a panel of 2,400 radio listeners pointed to a variety of recommendations, such as initiating multiple 30-second ads instead of fewer 60-second ads, testing creative before launch and deploying a total audio strategy to reach omnichannel listeners.

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Overcoming the Diversity Gap in Mobile Gaming

Chloé GingrichGlobal Insights Strategist, Gaming & eCommerce, Meta Stephen GrayVertical Research Manager, Meta

Key Takeaways

  • Mobile gamers surveyed felt more connected and immersed in gameplay with characters that represented them or people like them.
  • The gap between mobile gamers’ desire for diversity and their actual gaming experience reflected that less than 40% of gamers felt represented by gaming characters.
  • Make gaming inclusive from development through to execution. Bake diversity in throughout the entire process of developing and marketing a game to show an integrated commitment to inclusion—never try to add diverse representation to a game as an afterthought or in an ad.
  • Promoting diversity should go hand in hand with safety in virtual spaces.
  • Avoid all stereotypes that include hypersexualization of women and hypermasculinity in character design.
  • Don’t use advertising to imply that the game is more inclusive than it is. The most effective ads should showcase exciting aspects of gameplay, as well as meaningful nuanced representation.

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Datagraphs: The Next Great Digital Advantage

Datagraphs capture how people work, play, learn, socialize, transact, travel and any other activity that can be associated with commerce. Leading technology companies are using datagraphs to personalize customer recommendations, update products, optimize advertising and more. The most successful examples include Amazon’s purchase graph, Google’s search graph, Facebook’s social graph, Netflix’s movie graph, Spotify’s music graph, Airbnb’s travel graph, Uber’s mobility graph, and LinkedIn’s professional graph. Each of these leverage the ongoing collection of customer engagement data, coupled with proprietary algorithms, to outcompete rivals in every way, from product creation to user experience.  We’ve all seen the signs in front of McDonald’s announcing “Over 99 Billion Served” and have watched the number rise over the years. But tracking how many burgers are sold every day, month or year is a relic of the past. Today what is asked is: Do we know where each consumer buys their burgers? At what time? What do they drink with it? What do they do before or after buying a burger? How can we satisfy more of their needs so that they keep coming back? Datagraphs capture this information, helping to reshape competition in every sector. Leaders must invest in upgrading their data architecture to enable a real-time, comprehensive view of how consumers interact with their products and services, so that they can develop unique ways to solve customer problems. Thanks to its rich data and industry-leading personalization, Amazon now owns 40% of the U.S. e-commerce market. Its closest rival, Walmart, has a market share of only 7%. Source: Govindarajan, V. and Venkatraman, N. Venkat. (May-June 2022). The Next Great Digital Advantage. Analytics and Data Science, Harvard Business Review.

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NYCU: “Heavyweight” Apps

Two reports illustrate the growth of apps in 2021.   App Annie's new report, the State of Mobile 2022, shows the growing pool of “heavyweight apps.”  It defines such apps as those generating more than $100 million in annual consumer spending. In 2021, this stood at 233, 174 of which were games. According to the report, there was a massive $170 billion spent in app stores last year. The report states, "Improved connectivity, screen size and hardware have made it easier than ever before to enjoy premium applications & gaming experiences on-the-go. Consumers, consequently, migrated share of wallet to mobile as the de facto gaming console and tool for managing our lives." Source: Armstrong, M. (January 13, 2022). Heavyweight Apps. App Stores: Tech, Statista. _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Apptopia has also looked at app trends in 2021 and provides a ranking of the most downloaded apps worldwide: Source: Freer, A. (2022, January 12). And the top downloaded apps in 2021 were… Business of Apps.    

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Apple ATT is Now Live. How are Brands Being Impacted, and What is the Path Forward?

Matt Voda, CEO of OptiMine, returned to the Insights Studio, on Oct. 5 to revisit the topic of Apple’s ATT changes and the impact they’re having on the measurement ecosystem. Matt provided an overview of Apple’s ATT changes from May 2021, with a focus on what changed, why and when. Given Apple’s impact—tracking going dark, rising CPMs and measurement holes—what are brands seeing? With tracking and privacy changing expected to move forward, how likely are they to impact brands even more? In terms of a path forward, what are practical steps to address the changes and determine a future-proof framework for brands in this new era of privacy?

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NYCU: Six Innovative Mobile Campaigns

Marketing Dive highlights six campaigns from around the globe for their innovative approaches to mobile advertising. After last year's 14% jump in time spent with mobile devices (an average of four hours and 16 minutes a day), consumers are steadily increasing their mobile usage by 2.5% this year, according to eMarketer. Popular app categories like audio, social and video are driving growth. Here are six of this year's most notable mobile campaigns:

  • Chipotle Mexican Grill and l.f. Cosmetics, two brands that consumers wouldn't necessarily associate with one another, partnered to offer a limited-time menu item and makeup collection inspired by burrito ingredients. Marketing collaborations between restaurants and makeup brands are more common in China, but still somewhat rare in the U.S. As brands experiment with ways to generate buzz with off-beat campaigns that engage people on digital platforms, they may see greater adoption.
  • Heinz teamed with Burger King and navigation app Waze on a campaign targeting Canadian drivers as they slogged through crowded streets. The campaign not only served traffic-activated ads through Waze, but also targeted those driving at the sluggish speed of a Heinz ketchup pour — about 0.03 miles per hour. Those Waze users received a digital coupon for a plant-based Impossible Whopper.
  • As the NFL hosted the first Super Bowl during the pandemic, its sponsors sought ways to parlay interest in the game into mobile engagement. Verizon launched a comprehensive campaign that included the debut of a virtual football stadium in the video game Fortnite and a livestreamed concert.
  • Seeking to create a cultural moment for home cooks, Barilla assembled a collection of Spotify songs with lengths equaling the cooking times for different kinds of pasta. It included the most popular genres of music in Italy, plus such hits as "Mixtape Spaghetti," "Boom Bap Fusilli" and "Pleasant Melancholy Penne."
  • Extending the merchandising efforts of prior campaigns, McDonald's created a capsule collection of clothing inspired by items from the special BTS menu. The campaign was notable for the mobile merchandising effort in which, rather than giving away the items, McDonald's sold them on the fan merchandise app Weverse Shop. 
  • Lay's supported its sponsorship of the UEFA Champions League with a campaign that harnessed emerging technologies to integrate its brand into conversations in chat and social media apps. The snack brand set up a website that let soccer fans create personalized video invitations from Lionel Messi, one of the sport's biggest stars.
  Source: William, R. (2021, July 8). 6 campaigns that stood out amid H1 growth in mobile usage, app spending. Marketing Dive.  

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NYCU: How Facebook’s News Feed Algorithm Works

Facebook’s new video describes their content ranking process and why some things gain more traction than others, based on individual response. As explained by Facebook: "Our goal is to make sure you see the posts that are most valuable to you at the top of your Feed every time you open the Facebook app. And because most people have more content in their News Feed than they could possibly browse in one session, we use an algorithm to determine the order of all of the posts you can see.” The video outlines the process of feed ranking, including the four key elements that Facebook considers when selecting relevant content to display to each user. Facebook explained, “Your News Feed can connect you to who and what matters most: your people, your interests and your world — all in one place. Our goal is to make sure you see the posts that are most valuable to you at the top of your Feed every time you open the Facebook app. And because most people have more content in their News Feed than they could possibly browse in one session, we use an algorithm to determine the order of all of the posts you can see. But how exactly does this algorithm work? How does it decide what to prioritize in your Feed? Find out in our next episode of Let Me Explain (see link below)— a video series that breaks down a complex topic related to safety and integrity on our platforms.” Sources: Hutchinson, A. (2021, July 12). Facebook Provides New Explainer on How Its News Feed Algorithm Works. Social Media Today. Facebook. (2021, July 12). How Does News Feed Work? Episode 3 of Let Me Explain Has Answers. Announcements, Facebook for Business: Facebook.  

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NYCU: Companies Adjust Predictive Models in Wake of Covid

FedEx and other firms are leaning more heavily on real-time, live data to gauge demand while paying less attention to measures obtained during the pandemic.  Companies reliant on complex algorithms to gauge customer demand, set prices or fine-tune supply chains are putting less weight on data generated during the coronavirus pandemic, as many consider it to be skewed. Companies in sectors such as travel, retail and logistics that saw wild swings in consumer behavior over the past year—from canceled vacations and business trips—to a surge in online shopping and home deliveries. As the economy opens, they are dealing with chaotic trend lines that complicate forecasting efforts. To adjust, many of these companies are leaning more heavily on real-time data to feed predictive software models, including live website activity or online and mobile searches, corporate data chiefs and industry analysts say. Sriram Krishnasamy, FedEx Corp.’s SVP of strategic programs and chief executive of the analytics unit at FedEx Dataworks, said traditional historic data became unreliable during the pandemic. This saw an abrupt increase in home-delivery orders from homebound shoppers and caused shipping delays. Real-time data sources offer a “bird’s eye view” of market changes as they unfold, Krishnasamy said. In a Forrester Research Inc. survey last fall, 64% of (roughly) 200 North American analytics and measurement professionals said their firms relied more heavily on real-time insights drawn from user behavior on their websites. That’s up from less than half in 2019. Beyond replacing older sources of data, about a quarter of companies surveyed are quickly retraining AI-powered predictive models because of data drift.  “As customer behavior changed almost overnight, the historical data used to train these models no longer reflected this new reality,” said Forrester’s Principal Analyst, Brandon Purcell. Source: Loten, A. (July 1, 2021). Companies Adjust Predictive Models in Wake of Covid FedEx and other firms are leaning more heavily on real-time live data to gauge demand. The Wall Street Journal.    

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NYCU: How Gen Z Watches Video Content

A new study by Horowitz, “State of Gen Z,” shows that most 13- to 24-year-old streamers watch content on many devices. Respondents named smartphones as their most frequently used device – no surprise there. However, a TV set came in a close second, ahead of devices usually named as Gen Z favorites, such as laptops and gaming consoles.     Source: Horowitz. (2021, March).  State of Gen Z.  Horowitz Research.

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