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Audio Advertising, Targeting, Creativity and Segmentation/CSR ads (Event Summary)

  • Insights Studio Series: Inside the JAR

A global panel of experts synthesized their work published in the Journal of Advertising Research September edition (60,3). Presentations investigated speech rates in audio commercials; targeting and brand loyalty in digital media; differences in how consumers and advertising professionals assess creative; and segmentation considerations in CSR advertising. In the Q&A that followed, the speakers connected insights from their research to the extraordinary events of 2020. Editor’s Note: The full summary is available to members only.

  • Article

NYCU: Opinions On Employee Activism

Fortune Magazine reports data showing that employees overwhelmingly believe speaking up against their employers is risking their jobs. Yet, employees also strongly believe that it is right to speak up. Colvin, G. (2020, September 21). The Activist Employee Hasn't Gone AwayFortune.

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  • Article

NYCU: Most Young Adults Live with Their Parents

The economic impact of the pandemic in the United States is pushing increasing numbers of young people to move back in with their parents. A recently released Pew Research Center analysis has found that a majority (52%) of Americans age 18-29 now live with a parent, the highest share recorded since the Great Depression era. The share reached its lowest point in 1960 with 29% living with their parents.   Source: McCarthy, N. (2020, September 7). Majority of U.S. Young Adults Now Live with Their Parents. Statista (Research from The Pew Research Center).

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  • Article

NYCU: Much Ado About TikTok

The popular TikTok app is owned by ByteDance, a Chinese multinational internet technology company. Three articles address the recent controversies about a possible ban. From The Verge: For experts, the concern (surrounding TikTok) is less about mass data collection and more about targeted operations that are harder to detect. Because TikTok maintains the standard level of invasive app access, the Chinese intelligence services could potentially use it as a portal to surveil specific users or gather compromising information. The FBI has already raised the alarm about Chinese spies stealing US trade secrets, so that same access is even scarier for Amazon or Wells Fargo, which might plausibly have proprietary tech that China wants to steal. As long as the Chinese government can put pressure on TikTok through its ownership, there will be ways to snoop on users without raising alarms. That makes it hard for high-risk users to feel entirely safe, no matter what the app does. Source: Newton, C. (2020, July 14). TikTok’s biggest problem is outside its control. The Verge.


From CNN:  Washington's top diplomat (Secretary of State Mike Pompeo) said that people should only download the app "if you want your private information in the hands of the Chinese Communist Party." "TikTok is led by an American CEO, with hundreds of employees and key leaders across safety, security, product, and public policy here in the US," a TikTok spokesperson said in a statement,  "We have no higher priority than promoting a safe and secure app experience for our users. We have never provided user data to the Chinese government, nor would we do so if asked." The app has exploded in popularity in the United States and other western countries, becoming the first Chinese social media platform to gain significant traction with users outside of its home country. It was downloaded 315 million times in the first three months of this year, more quarterly downloads than any other app in history. Source: Disis, J., Hansler, J. (2020, July 7). The United States is 'looking at' banning TikTok and other Chinese social media apps, Pompeo says. CNN.
From Morning Consult: Source: Piacenza, J. (2020, July 9). Public Divided on TikTok Ban as U.S. Considers Clampdown on Chinese Social Media Apps. Morning Consult.  

Shifting the Perception of Aging Today (Event Summary)

  • ARF VIRTUAL SALON SERIES

At this virtual Salon, Barbara Shipley from AARP and Andrew Delaney from Getty Images discussed their initiative to encourage advertisers to avoid stereotypes in the portrayal of the 50+ population in ads. Tiffanie Papp from P&G/SeeMe Beauty shared why it is important for SeeMe Beauty to create ads that resonate with 50+ consumers. Editor’s Note: The full summary is available to members only.

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  • Article

NYCU: Brands and Black Lives Matter Protests

Editor’s Note:  This article focuses on consumers’ reaction to what brands/companies should do and say in the wake of current protests. Please note that results indicate “NET” favorability, i.e. More Favorable View minus Less Favorable View about the company. Brands Are Speaking Out on Black Lives Matter. How Are Consumers Going to Respond? Backing protesters is divisive; backing small firms is not. What brands shouldn't do is stay silent  As protests following the death of George Floyd while in police custody multiplied across the country, many major brands used their platforms to speak up about systemic racial inequality, police violence and the Black Lives Matter movement. While in the past brands often avoided aligning themselves with political and social issues for fear of alienating swatches of consumers or striking the wrong tone, some of the country’s biggest companies now have made exceptions to that policy. It’s the right move, according to new Morning Consult polling. Even though the survey shows that brands’ voicing of support for such causes is a divisive matter, especially along racial lines, there is one thing people agree on: Brands should not stay silent. Among all adults, as well as both black and white consumers, more people than not said that if a company declined to make an official statement about the protests, that would cause them to see a brand in a less favorable light. Responses also differed along generational lines. Almost three-quarters (73 percent) of Generation Z and millennials said they view brands that support protesters on social media more favorably, while 39 percent of Generation X and Baby Boomers said the same. Sixty-nine percent said that it is important to mention the death of George Floyd in company messages responding to the demonstrations, and roughly two-thirds said they find it appropriate for CEOs (68 percent) and executives (65 percent) to share messages about the demonstration. Brands might also consider asking their employees to participate in racial sensitivity training, as 41 percent of respondents said that would increase brand favorability. Forty-eight percent of black Americans said that would be the case for them, while 39 percent of white Americans agreed. With the economic impact of the coronavirus still on the minds of many, 74 percent of all U.S. adults said it is important for companies to emphasize support of small businesses in their messaging, and 72 percent said the same of the protection of private property and stores. Source: Meyers, A. (2020, June 2). Brands Are Speaking Out on Black Lives Matter. How Are Consumers Going to Respond? Morning Consult.    

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