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The 1st Annual Organizational Benchmark Survey—The Consultancy Report

The Organizational Benchmark Survey investigates the changes in advertising and marketing research over the past year. This is the first of an annual series. The consultancy report covers a variety of subjects, including the names of their research departments and their structures, whether they are centralized or decentralized, their spending and KPIs, what skills researchers need and what tools they employ, and how satisfied they are with their department.

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Navigating the Messy Middle – Intersectionality in the Workplace

  • EVENT SUMMARY
  • Jackie Lorch, Vice President, Global Knowledge Management, Dynata

The second installment of the ARF Cultural Effectiveness Council’s Navigating the Messy Middle series -- which focused on the workplace experiences and strategies of mid-career professionals from diverse communities -- hosted two successful executives who have developed their careers in the advertising and media industries.

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Take the 2nd Annual ARF Organizational Benchmark Survey

  • ARF

The Organizational Benchmark Survey was developed to examine the dramatic changes taking place in advertising and marketing research organizations in recent years. Developed by the ARF Analytics Council, last year’s survey produced a set of reports covering the advertiser, agency, research company, media & entertainment and consultancy sectors. The ARF also released access to the raw data for members to interrogate themselves via our interface. (Note, you must download the free Tableau reader before doing so. Find instructions on how to do so here). These reports and the database have been helpful to members in understanding how their organization compares to others in their sector, with respect to management of the insights and data analytics functions.

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The Organizational Benchmark Survey Database

  • THE ARF

Our first, annual benchmark survey looked into the dramatic changes that occurred in advertising and marketing research organizations from 2018-2019. We have delivered a series of reports: the advertiser, agency, research, media & entertainment and consultancy report. Now, the ARF has released the interactive access via a searchable database. Members can interrogate the data and findings themselves and query segmentations such as job title, category, structure, size and investment trends.

Member Only Access

The 1st Annual Organizational Benchmark Survey—The Consultancy Report

  • THE ARF

The Organizational Benchmark Survey investigates the changes in advertising and marketing research over the past year. This is the first of an annual series. The consultancy report covers a variety of subjects, including the names of their research departments and their structures, whether they are centralized or decentralized, their spending and KPIs, what skills researchers need and what tools they employ, and how satisfied they are with their department.

Member Only Access
  • Article

NYCU: Working from Home & Return to the Office

A survey of ad industry employees reveals uneasiness and worries about working remotely as well as returning to the workplace. According to a Nabs survey, staff well-being needs to be a greater priority for businesses. The organization conducted a poll of more than 500 industry employees on their job status, working challenges, pressures and coping mechanisms. When asked what they were struggling with the most during lockdown, 57% of respondents cited a lack of motivation and drive, while 52% said it was anxiety. Only 6% of employees said they were not struggling with any well-being issues. Managers are also seeking more support from their employers: 43% said they wanted additional help to better manage their teams and cope with the increased emotional challenges among staff. As businesses prepare to reopen offices, 61% of employees said they felt a return to the workplace would be unsafe or increase their anxiety. However, working at home is also presenting challenges, with 51% reporting suffering from physical problems due to at-home working and 48% saying they are not getting enough exercise. Eighty-eight percent want to work from home more and 48% were keen for more flexible start and finish times to support their transition back to the office. Seventy-six percent were missing the spontaneous conversations, rapport and social aspects of work. Only 16% said they never wanted to return to the office again. Source: Kiefer, B. (2020, July 10). Industry employees anxious and unmotivated to return to office, survey finds. campaignUS.    

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The 1st Annual Organizational Benchmark Survey—Media & Entertainment Report

  • The ARF

The Organizational Benchmark Survey investigates the changes in advertising and marketing research over the past year. This is the first of an annual series. The media and entertainment report covers a variety of subjects, including the names of their research departments and their structures, whether they are centralized or decentralized, their spending and KPIs, what skills researchers need and what tools they employ, and also how satisfied they are with their department.

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YP Share Group – Managing Remotely (Up, Down and Sideways)

The focus of the ARF’s Managing Remotely Share Group was how to effectively communicate up to a team leader, down to a direct report or laterally with other team members. Cole Strain, Head of Measurement Solutions at Pinterest shared his strategies and experience with remotely managing people and projects. Following the presentation, attendees joined small moderated breakout sessions where they discussed personal and professional challenges while working remotely, including creative ways to connect, a new work/life balance, and how to continue these practices if or when there is a return to the office.

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  • Article

NYCU: Why Do Great Creative Ideas Get Killed?

Editor’s Note: The authors of this Journal of Advertising Research article begin with this anonymous creative professional, “It is a roller coaster—you can have a good idea accepted and be on a real high one moment, and the same day a great idea is rejected and you are on a real low.” Their study hopes to provide guidance for improving the creative process.   Why Do Great Creative Ideas Get Killed? Ask any ad-agency creative professional whether their best ideas ever see the light of day, and the answer likely will be “no”. That outcome is a function of a highly contentious, early-stage evaluation and selection process. Researchers in Australia and New Zealand reexamined the process, offering takeaways for moving great ideas forward—and for fostering a more welcoming climate for creative risk-taking. The idea evaluation and selection process—central to the success of agencies and clients—can either foster or frustrate creativity. It begs the question, “Can people recognize a great creative idea if someone shows it to them?” Both sides—idea generators (creatives) and external judges (in this case senior agency executives) usually can agree on an idea’s originality. Where the idea dies is often in disagreement over whether it’s an appropriate solution for marketing—which either fuels or kills confidence that creative directors and other senior executives have in pitching the idea to the client. The researchers recommend a two-stage idea-selection process: Identify the most original ideas, even those that seem outrageous (since originality is what both idea generators and observers are most likely to agree on), and identify the strategy that underlies each idea – to support the appropriateness of the campaign. The second stage is the hardest part. “Extra attention needs to go to more difficult-to-understand ideas,” the researchers wrote. Here’s how they did the research: Qualitative interviews with high-level creative professionals helped shape their research questions. Next, 49 creative professionals and 65 account executives were given a brief describing the requirements of an advertising campaign. They were instructed to create an advertisement idea and assess the originality and appropriateness of their work. Then, judges trained to assess the creative work through the eyes of senior management, scored the creative on originality and appropriateness. The creators and judges generally agreed on originality, but not on appropriateness. Expression of ideas was a key issue. Agencies need to “address head-on possible weaknesses creative professionals may have in expressing creative ideas,” the researchers wrote. Moreover, creatives should be fully aware of problems that marketing managers face, and the terminology marketing managers use, to evaluate their own performance. Source: Kilgour, M, (University of Waikato), Koslow, S. (Macquarie University), and O'Connor, H.  (University of Waikato). (2020, March 1). Why Do Great Creative Ideas Get Rejected? Journal of Advertising Research.    

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The State of Insights and Data Analytics Disciplines Today (Event Summary)

  • VIRTUAL INSIGHTS STUDIO SERIES

In 2019, the ARF Analytics Council undertook its first benchmark survey on the operations of research and analytics departments to develop a baseline understanding of the state of the insights and data analytics discipline within the industry today. The survey explored the way in which technology and the advent of new sources of data have transformed the way we work. This Insights Studio presented survey findings and shed light on where the field stands. Editor’s Note: The full summary is available to members only.

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