fbpx

creative effects

  • Article

Getting Creative Right: The Dynamics of Interactive Video Ads

Over the past two decades, Duane Varan of MediaScience has conducted more than 100 studies about video advertisements that have interactivity features. “We know that interactivity is physiologically more arousing; people are more engaged, and that translates into better memory,” he said. “So, we know that interactive ads work, but now the question is: Why do they work, (and not) what we can do, but what we should do.”

Member Only Access
  • Article

Doldrum of COVID Leads to Breakthrough Creative

In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, PepsiCo embarked on a 21-month research project to find out how the quarantining affected people’s lives. The goal: adapt its brand messaging to the experiences of its core consumers, from both a human and consumption perspective, and then develop new creative. “We know that our primary consumers are really out there,” Kevin Moeller of PepsiCo said, citing data on Pepsi’s core base. “They enjoy letting loose, they don’t like to hold back. They’re people that sing karaoke and cheer at sports events. So how did quarantining impact them?”

Member Only Access
  • Article

Growing ROI with YouTube ABCDs Creative Effectiveness Guidelines

Creative is the dominant ROI driver across all media platforms according to Nielsen Catalina Solutions: creative 49%, media 36%, and brand 15%. However, creative is challenging to measure. The speakers provided an ABCD insights framework for building effective ads on YouTube based on the key creative elements that drive sales as proven by Google’s partner, Nielsen.

Member Only Access
  • Article

The A-B-4C Model of Winning Advertising

What is the special sauce that elevates an advertising campaign from workmanship to artistry? Olson Zaltman researchers reviewed more than 200 of the most iconic advertising campaigns to “separate the best of the best from the rest,” then wove their findings into what they called the A-B-4C Model of Winning Advertising. Brands and agencies developing new creative can look to this model, or look at existing ideas through lens of this model, to see which elements of it are in their campaigns. “There’s no guarantee your brand will be a huge hit, you still have to pull the correct emotional levels,” James Forr asserted. However, having “one or more of these elements suggests that the odds of success for your campaign will go up significantly”:

Member Only Access
  • Article

MISFITS: How Creativity in Advertising Sparks Brand Growth

The advertising industry needs more support in its efforts to harness creativity. Pointing to a Cannes-Lions State of Creativity report statistic—just 20% of brand leaders feel confident they can convince CFOs to invest in high-quality creative work—Adam Sheridan of Ipsos believes his research can help agencies and brand managers overcome barriers to adopting and promoting quality creative. He offered insights from his upcoming book, MISFITS: How Creativity in Advertising Sparks Brand Growth.

Member Only Access

Does Animation Help or Hurt Rx Drug Ads?

  • JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING RESEARCH

Animated and rotoscoped characters in television commercials can affect consumers differently than live actors. But in direct-to-consumer ads for prescription drugs (which convey risks and benefits), can these characters alter the ways people process the information and therefore, their perceptions about the brand and the ad? A new study has some surprising findings and opens the door to further research.

When Are Dogs an Advertiser’s Best Friend?

  • Rohit H. Trivedi; Thorsten Teichert
  • JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING RESEARCH

Animals have been used in ads effectively for decades, yet little is known about their effects on consumer reactions along the purchase-decision process. New research shows evidence of animals’ influences on different stages of the decision-making journey, with women reacting more positively than men. But the outcomes changed when human models were included in the ads.

Member Only Access
  • Article

NYCU: Can Ads with LGBTQ Images Have Wide Appeal?

Two papers in the current issue of the Journal of Advertising Research (JAR) explore consumer reactions to ads with depictions of gay couples. But they come to different conclusions. Comparing the ad creative explains why. The June 2020 issue of the JAR is focused on “Gender and Diversity” and contains two papers on LGBTQ images in print ads. Bradley Bond and Justine Farrell (University of San Diego) ask, “Does Depicting Gay Couples in Ads Influence Behavioral Intentions?” The other paper, by Gavin Northey et al. (researchers in Australia and New Zealand), is entitled, “LGBTQ Imagery in Advertising.”

  • Not surprisingly, both studies found favorable reactions to the ads among most gay consumers. The first study also reported mostly favorable reactions among heterosexual consumers, as long as they found the ads interesting and relevant. In other words, the presence of gay people in the ads appeared to be secondary – which the authors see as a noteworthy, new development that reflects cultural shifts in attitudes towards gays in the US.
  • In contrast, the second study found political ideology to be a strong influencer on reactions to the ads. The researchers identified “disgust” among conservatives, especially to images with two males, as a driver of negative reactions.
We think that a comparison of the creative used in the two studies explains why the studies came to different conclusions. The first study used ads (by Target, Tiffany, and the Gap) of couples looking at each other, wearing nice clothes. The second study created ads (for a watch and spring water) that included depictions of almost naked couples in very close contact.
  • The data suggest that depicting gay couples as consumers in love is likely to result in positive reactions; sexual depictions of gay couples, however, is risky.
Sources: Bond, B. and Farrell, J. (2020, June 1). Does Depicting Gay Couples in Ads Influence Behavioral Intentions? The Journal of Advertising Research. Northey, et al. (2020, June 1). LGBTQ Imagery in Advertising:How Viewers' Political Ideology Shapes Their Emotional Response to Gender And Sexuality in Advertisements. The Journal of Advertising Research

Member Only Access