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Reach & frequency

  • Article

The Cross-Platform Measurement Shift: Content to Ad Exposure

Bob Ivins of TVSquared by Innovid, presented a discussion on the shift to cross-platform measurement in television viewing. In this presentation, the speaker examined the changes in consumer behavior in television viewership, challenges presented in metrics stemming from audience fragmentation, new platforms and new currencies in metrics. Additionally, the speaker gave key metric areas to consider in the era of converged TV.

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  • Article

ACR Data Uncovers the Inefficiencies of Linear TV Ad Delivery

In this presentation, Justin Fromm of LG Ads discussed how ACR data can help uncover the inefficiencies of ads delivered via linear television. In this session, the speaker examined linear TV as still playing a vital role for advertisers. Additionally, he pointed to changes in consumer viewing habits, shifting towards streaming. He noted much of the advertising industry's focus is on incremental reach when placing an ad on television. Leveraging ACR data, the speaker demonstrated how this more robust data source can help improve optimal reach and frequency, when advertising on television.

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  • Article

Understand the Impact of Your TV Viewing Data Source

In his quest to understand and solve the challenge of "cross-screen measurement, John-Michael Del Valle of LiveRamp addressed the question, "How can I understand my media plan, where those impressions are landing and how do I get the full picture?" In addressing this and other related questions, the speaker examined combining ACR and STB data as a method to produce an all-encompassing way to measure ad lift on linear television.

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  • Article

Privacy Safe Approach to Ecommerce Audience Quality Measurement

A multi-billion dollar pet food manufacturer analyzed its audience targeting strategy with the goal of ensuring efficient online ad spending, according to Souptik Datta and Zulema Doiny-Cabre of GroupM. The analysis with GroupM evaluated the performance of existing audience segments, pinpointed profiles of high-performing audience segments for additional opportunities and determined the optimal ad impression frequency.

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  • Article

One Size [Does Not] Fit All Optimizing Audio Strategies for Success

What spot length works best? Audacy partnered with Veritonic to compare frequent radio listener responses to 15, 30 and 60-second ads across multiple categories such as auto, financial, retail and professional services to address this frequently asked question. Jenny Nelson (Audacy) and Korri Kolesa (Veritonic) presented the results of this study, which were measured by Veritonic’s audio score components such as attribute score, intent score and engagement score. This survey-based study of a panel of 2,400 radio listeners pointed to a variety of recommendations, such as initiating multiple 30-second ads instead of fewer 60-second ads, testing creative before launch and deploying a total audio strategy to reach omnichannel listeners.

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  • Article

Understanding the Relationship Between Creative Attention and Media Performance

Realeyes and TVision presented an analysis of the relationship between pre-test measures of “creative attention” (from Realeyes) and in-market attention to television advertising (from TVision). Realeyes’ “Quality Score” has three components: an ad’s ability to capture visual attention, its ability to retain attention and its ability to encode attention. Their overall quality scores were strongly correlated with TVision’s Creative Attention Scores for Consumer Tech Ads, moderately correlated for CPG ads, and weakly correlated for streaming entertainment ads. The environment in which an ad is shown plays a major role in the degree to which viewers pay attention to an ad, particularly for low-performing creative. The speakers showed an example of a video ad with relatively low attention quality, as measured by Realeyes, which nonetheless had relatively high Creative Attention in-market due to running in environments with high viewability and high attention.

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  • Article

CMO Briefs: Optimal Frequency Planning: Research, Guidelines & Recommendations

Despite a significant amount of research focusing on optimal frequency and recency, stemming back to the 1960’s, there is very little consensus on how many exposures/impressions are “too many” across platforms. Indeed, a blank frequency cap is likely to lead to inefficiencies. The bottom line, there is no simple “rule of thumb” for optimal frequency planning. Read more.

Optimal Frequency Planning: Research, Guidelines & Recommendations

  • Knowledge at Hand; CMO Brief

Despite a significant amount of research focusing on optimal frequency and recency, going back decades, little consensus exists on how many exposures/impressions are “too many” across platforms. Indeed, a blank frequency cap is likely to lead to inefficiencies. The bottom line, there is no simple “rule of thumb” for optimal frequency planning.

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  • Article

NYCU: Why Advertising Doesn’t Work More Often

Jenni Romaniuk, Research Professor at the Ehrenberg-Bass Institute for Marketing Science, suggests that identifying the main causes of advertising failure can help us make ads more effective. If you believe the primary outcome of advertising is to persuade people to buy things they normally wouldn’t, then advertising will mostly disappoint.  That is not the most common benefit a brand gets from advertising. Advertising is just a broad name for company-controlled creative activity (in any media) aimed at shaping buyer memories in the brand’s future favor. A buyer’s memory is one of the most efficient sources of information (even for a google search, you need to remember what to type in). Advertising can freshen memories for a specific brand, to make the brand easier to retrieve. Andrew Ehrenberg called this role of advertising Creative Publicity – a way to publicize the brand, remind people of what it does and when to buy it, and on occasion, share some news such as informing about a new variant launched. For advertising to work and freshen brand memories and in turn, help brands grow, a number of pieces need to be in place. Here are three fails to fix to help advertising to work more often.

  • Failure to reach – Often reach failure happens at the planning stage, where marketers don’t plan for reach in the first place. It also happens after that, at the creative stage where the plan might be in place, but the creative just doesn’t get any attention. For advertising to work, we need to fix the advertising distribution issues of planning, delivering and noticing failures in reach.
  • Failure to brand – Much of the paid for reach is wasted because it failed to brand. Whether via the brand name or distinctive assets, we need to get better at branding in every media environment so advertising can work for the brand.
  • Failure to be buyable – Presence in as many channels/retailers as possible is a start, but you need the prominence to be found in competitive clutter, and a portfolio item suitable for that buying occasion.
These insights are supported by the Ehrenberg-Bass Institute’s research programs. Examples of projects in process include, what happens to different brands when they stop advertising for a long period of time (which is a better test than just stopping advertising for a week or a month), how to use distinctive assets to brand better in different contexts and how to construct better portfolios to realize revenue from good advertising.  Source: Romaniuk, J. (2021, January 4). Let’s ask a better question: Why doesn’t advertising work (more often)? WARC.    

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The Myth of Targeting Loyal, Niche Audiences

  • Harsh Taneja (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  • JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING RESEARCH

With unlimited consumer choices in the digital marketplace, advertisers often turn away from websites with mass appeal and toward niche outlets, for their small, but potentially loyal audiences. Such a strategy is actually unwise, diminishing reach, according to evidence from a study analyzing double-jeopardy effects in digital media usage.

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