engagement

ARF Attention Measurement Validation Initiative: Phase 2 Report

  • ARF ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Explore the latest findings from the ARF Attention Measurement Validation Initiative. The phase two report is a comprehensive examination of various attention measurement methods used in creative testing. It concludes with reflections on the challenges of attention measurement, as well as some suggestions for advertisers on how to choose and evaluate attention measurement providers.

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Determining the Value of Emotional Engagement to TV

Pedro AlmeidaCEO, MediaProbe

Context matters—not all reach is equal, and so, we need a way to qualify each impression and valuate each of these impressions. Metric of valuation needs to be valid, reliable and have predictive power for business outcomes. The research focus: 1) What can we say about the value of emotional engagement (EE)? 2) Can we model the value of EE via its impact on memory? 3) Can we use EE to optimize and valuate content and ad positions? How? Methodology: MediaProbe used Galvanic Skin Response with participants who were exposed to content through a MediaProbe panel (U.S., 2,700 households). Data gets delivered second by second and data extracted goes toward creating an impact measure of how much people are reacting to what they are watching. The platform calculates an impact value that enables comparisons across media platforms. There was an added layer to see whether participants are leaning into the content and are engaged. U.S. TV dataset includes over 45,000 participants, reaching over 85,000 hours. More than 1,000 TV hours are monitored and over 42,500 ads. Using a subset of 16,351 ads and 329 “premium pod” formats, participants watch content and are then asked which ads they remember. Findings:
  1. Enhancing the emotional impact of an ad in 150 EIS points equates to adding a second 30’ ad unit. This will increase probability of brand recall by 15%. For each 100 points, this increases probability of brand recall by 10%.
  2. Single best predictor of whether someone will respond to an ad is how much a person was engaged with the content prior to the ad. EE carries over to the ad break. It’s more engaging pre-break, in earlier breaks and earlier position in break, which leads to higher ad impact.
  3. However, this is different across genres. Genre moderates pre-break emotional patterns. This is further differentiated within genres. For instance, people will react differently to ad breaks when watching soccer vs. some other sport. MediaProbe shows that there is 66% similarity between various award shows in terms of EE to ad breaks. They use this data to realize the value of different ads placed in different breaks (1st, 2nd, etc. break) and pods. Emotional engagement helps better predict ads performance.
  4. Additional findings show that first-in-break still rules and that premium pods deliver higher recall.
Key takeaways:
  • Ad EIS is systematically associated with ad recall.
  • It is possible to optimize ads for estimated impact by advertising in the most engaging content and being present after the most engaging moments.
  • Different genres tend to have typical pre-break engagement morphologies. This allows to estimate the delivered value of each pod position (and order in break when relevant).

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How Co-viewing and Other Factors Impact Viewer Attention to CTV

Monica LongoriaHead of Marketing Insights, LG Ad Solutions

Tristan WebsterChief Product Officer, TVision

The research presented included an online survey of over 1,000 respondents incorporated with TVision’s 5,000+ U.S. home panel data. Questions asked: 1. Does CTV garner more attention? 2. Are consumers more likely to co-view CTV? 3. Does co-viewing negatively affect attention? TVision’s equipment includes their always-on panel, a webcam that can capture how many people are in the room and eyes on screen at a second by second, a router meter to understand which CTV device is on and detects apps. TVision measurement engine includes remote device management and ACR engine. Findings:
  1. CTV in general has 13% higher attention index. Attention increases due to purposeful watching. Co-viewing CTV has stronger impact in comparison to linear (75% higher).
  2. Streaming is a popular co-viewing experience with mostly a non-negative impact to attention. Households with kids are more likely to pay attention to streaming content and ads with 36% more likely to discuss what is seen on TV. There are three different types of co-viewing: family setup with different age group (increased attention depends on genre), adults only setup with similar gender and age (biggest impact on attention), mixed adults only setup.
  3. Streaming is gaining ground as a co-viewing method for watching sports. Watching sports is typically with other people.
Implications for brands and marketers:
  1. CTV offers opportunity to create more engaging ads with higher levels of attention. CTV has digital capabilities that garner more attention. There is a need to create ads that are specific for CTV (in contrast to linear).
  2. Co-viewing can be an opportunity to turn your brand into a discussion.
  3. Measurement providers give us new insights into viewer behavior.
Key takeaways:
  • There is a higher attention with CTV in comparison to linear.
  • Positive impact of co-viewing: Co-viewing on streaming platforms is popular and generally maintains or increases attention.
  • Streaming is increasingly preferred for watching sports in a co-viewing context, offering new opportunities for targeted advertising and engagement in sports content.
  • Implications for brands and advertisers: The engaging nature of CTV offers ample opportunities for more impactful ads. Co-viewing experiences can transform ads into discussion points among viewers, enhancing brand engagement.

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EEG Illuminates Social Media Attention Outcomes

Shannon Bosshard, Ph.D.Lead Scientist, Playground XYZ

Bill HarveyExecutive Chairman, Bill Harvey Consulting

Advertising starts with attention. If gained and sustained long enough, brain engagement occurs. Once this happens, memory encoding might happen, and that is when incremental brand equity and sales occur. Attention economy has now reached a pivotal moment: What is it that drives attention and how is this related to outcomes? Is it media platforms or creative? The presenters took two approaches: the first was brand lift studies (focusing on the conscious) with 20,000 participants, 35 well-established brands, 60 ads, on social media platforms, using eye tracking and post exposure survey. The second approach was a neuro study focusing on the subconscious, with 50 participants, across 150 sessions, people exposed to over 1,800 ads. They used a combination of eye tracking and EEG, and RMT method for measuring motivations. Hypotheses:
  1. Some ads achieve their desired effects with lower attention than others.
  2. Platform attention averages mislead media selection because they leave out the effect of the creative and the effect of motivations.
  3. Higher order effects add to our understanding of what is “optimal”: motivation, memory encoding, immersion, cognition load.
By isolating the impact of the platform (same creatives across multiple channels), the research shows that platform is not the largest driver of outcomes. In only 25% of the times there is a statistical difference between media platforms. Instead, the creatives determine outcomes: in 96% of cases we see statistical difference between media platforms. Creatives present the best opportunity for behavior change. The platform might be the driver of attention, but creative is the driver of outcome. Put differently, platforms dictate the range of attention and how the consumer interacts, but it’s the creative that drives outcomes. Attention/non attention is affected by motivations and subconscious decisions (to be proven in future). Neuroscience taps into the subconscious— memory encoding, immersion (engagement), approach (attitude), cognitive load. They compiled overall averages to make inferences regarding where to place your ad. RMT methodology used driver tags to code an ad (or any piece of content) using human coders to see how many of these tags belong to the ad. This methodology was used to examine the resonance between the ad and the person. Key takeaways:
  • Attention drives outcomes—there’s a need to understand how it is related within that cycle.
  • Creative is key—there is a need to understand how much attention is needed to drive outcome.
  • Consider consumer motivation—this correlates with neuroscience metrics and allows for more nuanced understanding of the importance of creative in driving outcomes.

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CTV Ads: Viewer Attention & Brand Metrics

Rohan CastelinoCMO, IRIS.TV

Mike TreonProgrammatic Lead, PMG

Representing the Alliance for Video Level Contextual Advertising (AVCA), Rohan Castelino (IRIS.TV) and Mike Treon (PMG) examined research conducted with eye tracking and attention computing company, Tobii. The research endeavor focused on the impact of AI-enabled contextual targeting on viewer attention and brand perception in CTV. Beginning the discussion, Rohan examined challenges with CTV advertising. He noted that advances in machine learning (ML) have empowered advertisers to explore AI enabled contextual targeting, which analyzes video frame by frame, uses computer vision, natural language, understanding, sentiment analysis, etc., to create standardized contextual and brand suitability segments. Highlighting a study of participants in U.S. households, the research specifically aimed to understand if AI-enabled contextual targeting outperformed standard demo and pub-declared metadata in CTV. Additionally, they wanted to understand if brand suitability had an impact on CTV viewers’ attention and brand perception. Results from the research found that AI-enabled contextual targeting outperformed standard demo and pub-declared metadata in CTV and increased viewer engagement. In closing, Mike provided the marketers’ perspective on the use of AI-enabled contextual targeted ads and its practical applications. Key takeaways:
  • Challenges with CTV advertising: Ads can be repetitive, offensive and sometimes irrelevant, in addition to ads being placed in problematic context.
  • In addition, buyers are unsure who saw the ad or what type of content the ad appeared within. A recent study by GumGum showed that 20% of CTV ad breaks in children’s content were illegal (e.g., ads shown for alcohol and casino gambling).
  • Advertisers have begun experimentation with contextual targeting in CTV, as a path to relevance.
  • A study conducted with U.S. participants that examined the effects of watching 90 minutes of control and test advertisements, using a combination of eye tracking, microphones, interviews and surveys to gather data found that:
    • AI-enabled contextual targeting attracts and holds attention (e.g., 4x fewer ads missed, 22% more ads seen from the beginning and 15% more total ad attention).
    • AI-enabled contextual targeting drives brand metrics (e.g., 2x higher unaided recall and 4x higher aided recall).
    • AI-enabled contextual targeting increases brand interest (e.g., 42% more interested in the product, 38% gained a deeper understanding).
  • Research to understand if brand suitability had an impact on CTV viewers’ attention and brand perception found that:
    • Poor brand suitability makes CTV viewers tune out ads and reduces brand favorability (e.g., 54% were less interested in the product, 31% liked the brand less).
    • AI-enabled contextual targeted ads are as engaging as the show.

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Super Bowl Ads Revisited

As all media are full of analyses, polls and commentaries, with this year’s Super Bowl ads, it is worth looking at research insights from past Super Bowls.

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Inside the Journal of Advertising Research: Sonic Branding, ASMR Engagement, and Who Wins in Activist Messaging?

  • JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING RESEARCH

At this Insights Studio, researchers in Europe, the U.K. and the U.S. presented work in relatively new fields that have high-impact potential for the advertising industry. Starting with a forthcoming paper on sonic branding, the authors described their ground-breaking framework for measuring the implicit effects of sonic branding using music to manipulate visual scenes in video, film and TV. Next, a deep dive into autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR)—a sensory-inducing device in ads—included strategies for helping brands collaborate with successful ASMR influencers. Lastly, a preview of an article to be published in the March Prosocial Advertising Special Issue showed how brand activism influences attitudes and purchase intentions, revealing a credibility gap between established activist brands and brands emerging in that space. Taking questions from Paul and from attendees, panelists in the concluding Q&A explored links between sonic branding and ASMR, the demographics of ASMR followers, ways for emergent activist brands to close the credibility gap with established activist brands, and future research possibilities.

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Influencer Partners a Must for Branded ASMR Content

  • JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING RESEARCH

How can brand managers maximize their engagement with tingle-inducing ASMR videos? A new study, recently published in the Journal of Advertising Research, offers evidence that brands risk being perceived as “inauthentic intruders” when advertising within ASMR communities. They should instead consider collaborating with ASMR influencers, especially those who are highly visible and/or terrific at building emotional connections with viewers.

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Utilizing FOMO to Increase Engagement with Your Brand

  • MSI

Fear of missing out (FOMO) is a phrase that social media has given rise to. Those who follow others on such platforms can be made anxious about their own life choices and use of free time when following friends and their activities online. If brands can properly understand this phenomenon, however, they can find ways to engage with customers, including through the content and events consumers most care about. Researchers in this Marketing Science Institute (MSI) working paper find that those who are most attracted to a brand are the ones who become the most engaged through such a strategy.

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